Getting Your Vitamin D Levels Checked is Something You Shouldn’t Ignore!

When you go to get your physical this year, don’t forget to ask your doctor to check your vitamin D levels. If you are suffering from a chronic autoimmune disease, chances are your vitamin D levels just might be next to none existent.

 

I had mine checked 3 years ago and was SHOCKED (I had been supplementing with vitamin D for 2 years) that my level was only 17-the normal range is between 30- 74 ng/ml, according to Livestrong.com.   In retrospect, I now know why my levels were so low.  Two years prior to getting my levels checked, I was only supplementing with 4oo i.u, which was recommended at that time, and I was expecting a baby.  Needless to say, the baby was taking all of the supplemental vitamin D from me.

 

After getting my lab results back, I began to do further research on vitamin D, and was greatly surprised to find that many Americans are deficient in vitamin D, especially African Americans.

 

Vitamin D Deficiency-America’s Epidemic

It turns out that one of the biggest health epidemics today is vitamin D deficiency.  In fact, it’s such a huge problem in America that everyone from integrative and conventional doctors to news outlets are reporting on the topic.  My mother has always said, if three people are telling you the same thing, you should listen to one of them.  I’m at full attention. Are you?

 

The Scoop on Vitamin D

Technically, vitamin D is not a vitamin, but rather a metabolic product called calcitriol. Calcitriol is a secosteroid hormone, which means that it is similar to a steroid and has an endocrine mechanism of action. Over 2000 of the genes in your body are regulated by vitamin D. Therefore a deficiency in this hormone has a tremendous impact on your health and has been linked to several diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis, and birth defects. In addition researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas say that there is a correlation between low serum levels of vitamin D and lupus. If you are deficient in vitamin D, let’s examine how you can restore your levels safely?

 

therefore, everyone should get their vitamin D levels checked during their annual physical. Moreover, you should request that your doctor give you the more accurate 25(OH)D blood test for the best results. What exactly is vitamin D and why is it so important?

 

Here what Dr. Oz  has to say.


 

Other Related Vitamin D Articles

 

Vitamin D is What Your Body Needs!

One of the biggest health epidemics today is vitamin D deficiency; therefore, everyone should get their vitamin D levels checked during their annual physical. Moreover, you should request that your doctor give you the more accurate 25(OH)D blood test for the best results. What exactly is vitamin D and why is it so important?

Technically, vitamin D is not a vitamin, but rather a metabolic product called calcitriol. Calcitriol is a secosteroid hormone, which means that it is similar to a steroid and has an endocrine mechanism of action. Over 2000 of the genes in your body are regulated by vitamin D. Therefore a deficiency in this hormone has a tremendous impact on your health and has been linked to several diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis, and birth defects. In addition researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas say that there is a correlation between low serum levels of vitamin D and lupus. If you are deficient in vitamin D, let’s examine how you can restore your levels safely?

If it is summer time, good old fashion sunlight is the ideal way to obtain vitamin D. If you have pale skin, you only need about 10-50 minutes in the sun with 40% of your body exposed. If you have dark skin, you will need to stay in the sun significantly longer. Also, note that sun bathing for 30 minutes during the summer, produces about 20,000 IUs of vitamin D. During the winter, you can use safe tanning beds such as The Vitality Home Tanning Bed (for body tanning) or the D Lite tanning system, which produces vitamin D in your body; however, your body doesn’t tan. If you’re one of those people who are afraid to catch some ultraviolet B rays, you can always take an oral vitamin D supplement or you can buy a vitamin D spray.  Do not take the synthetic vitamin D2 supplement that your doctor might recommend. Instead, take a vitamin D3 supplement for optimum absorption. Adults can safely take up to 5,000 units per day (children should take half of that amount). Make sure that your progress is being monitored monthly by your doctor because over dosing on this vitamin can be fatal. Your vitamin D levels should be at least in the 50-60 ng/ml range for optimal health. If you have cancer, your levels should be in the 60-90 ng/ml range to aid in restoring your health.

Here what Dr. Oz  has to say.